THE HIDDEN TRUTH


Hidden truth is a project for African and non-African men living in Medway who are in abusive relationship. They meet once a month to socialise and get training on assertiveness, health and safety etc. It is a support Network that provides information, one to one support, counselling and available options to victims to prevent mental ill-health, alcohol dependency and reduce isolation. This is the first and one of its’ kind in the Medway.
When talking about Domestic violence we often refer to the victim of abuse as female, the abuser as male. We have realised that there are many men within our community who are either current victims of domestic abuse or have survived and escaped an abusive relationship; there are no support system for them in the area.
Many of the effects of abuse for the male victim of domestic violence are the same as for women.
A lot of male victims of abuse however, have great difficulty defining it as such. This is partially due to the image our African society generally has of a Man. Men are often thought of as strong, domineering and macho. Boys, even at a young age, are taught that it is unmanly to cry (“big boys don’t cry”). To many Africans, the idea of a grown man being frightened or vulnerable is a taboo.
The idea to embark on the project originated form one of the Faith leaders in Medway who have been overwhelmed by the number of men coming to him to seek advice about their situation at home. Within the African communities it is uncommon for men to be at the receiving end. HACO was asked to step in and get something done in other to bring the situation to the public so that whoever is in a similar situation will not go and kill them as a Zimbabwe man did in Sheffield because he could not take the humiliation anymore
Expected Outcomes
• The information on Men abuse will increase their skills and confidence. They will know what to do if they are caught up in a violent relationship and where to go for help.
• As the names of the project indicate (The Hidden Truth) will now be an open truth. Victims will know that they are not alone, that there are many men out there like them.
hidden secrets


UPDATED HACO PROJECT


Health Action Charity Organisation MBE (HACO) has broadened its strategic position from HIV prevention and support to focus on improving the general health and wellbeing of Africans living in the Medway area.
This change in direction follows HACO members’ own changing priorities locally.
There are still high rates of HIV amongst Africans, but recent improvements to HIV treatment mean that people living with HIV can expect to live longer. This is coupled with the documented susceptibility of people living with HIV to other related health conditions and issues which means it is no longer possible to address HIV in isolation.
The African community is also disproportionately and adversely affected by other health conditions, including sickle cell anemia and heart disease. Though HACO will still work on HIV and sexual health, emphasis will be on awareness and prevention of cancer, diabetes, stroke and mental health.
However, as our work develops, we continue to be led by our members and community and so we will develop new work streams concentrating on other health conditions and issues that affects our community.
We are at present carrying out projects on Domestic Abuse and support group for men in abusive relationships. This support group is for anyone from all background living in Medway. With funding from Tampon Tax community Fund, we are also addressing the issue of Female Genital Mutilation as it affects the African communities in Medway. See attached information flyers
Our African community-led responses to HIV have achieved significant successes and continue to represent the most effective means of responding to HIV in the African communities.
Mental Health
Mental health should be one of African community health priority. Black Africans have the highest rate of access to hospital in-patient care for those in contact with mental health services, at 16.5 per 100 mental health service users, compared with 8.5 in the White British group.
Stroke
Currently there is not enough research being done into the impact of Stroke on the African community or the extent to which Africans know about stroke and its risk factors. This is going to be one of HACO’s priorities this year.
Diabetes
African and African-Caribbean people are up to three times more likely than the general population to have Type 2 diabetes. HACO notes the worrying evidence that Africans are at a twofold risk of diabetes – genetic and socio- economic.
Cancer
The disproportionate levels of breast and prostate cancer in people of African origin warrant a specific, targeted and immediate response. Watch out for our Cancer awareness project coming soon.

We look forward to working with you all to improve the health and well being of Africans living in the Medway area. If you want to work with us, we are open to partnership working for the benefit of our community. You can e-mail or call us on 01634 844044


OPENING HOURS

MONDAYS TO THURDAYS : 9.30AM TO 3PM
FRIDAYS : CLOSED.

Please note, we operate with a small part-time staff team and therefore sometimes it is not easy to reach us on the telephone. However, if you leave a message someone will call you back. You can also communicate with us by email to info@healthaction.co.uk


Wanted – help with survey on long-term use of prescription medicines

Adults in the UK who use antiretroviral prescription medicines for their long-term condition are being invited to take part in an anonymous on-line survey which is attempting to find out day-to-day experiences of medication use.
The questionnaire is being run by four final year students on an MPharm course at the Medway School of Pharmacy, which is part of the Universities of Greenwich and Kent in Medway.
The findings will support the Medicines Optimisation agenda developed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and endorsed by NHS England. The Royal Pharmaceutical Society initiative is supporting an NHS call for optimised use of medicines in order to improve people’s experiences of care.
The survey should only take 10 to 15 minutes to complete and it is being supervised by Dr Barbra Katusiime and Dr Rebecca Cassidy at the University of Kent.
You can find a link to the survey here:

https://survey.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5i3kfpm6Qfk4GjPHowdoyoufeelaboutyourmedicines-page-001 (1)


Report on Elders’ Respect Among Young People – A Cross-Cultural Study of Britons and Africa

Elderly Respect

 

Respect your elders.” This statement may seem all too familiar, but is it really being followed these days? Everyday as I flip through the television, I witness discrimination against the old and wise. Frequently on television programmes, I notice a false portrayal of old people as being boring and in poor health. The audience laughs as a teenager yells words at a grandmother whose hearing is failing or a grandfather having trouble finding his false teeth. I don’t know about the rest of the world, but I’m not laughing.

 

 

Just like us, our elders were once young. They have memories of different fads, their first job, their first love, mistakes they’ve made, things they’ve discovered…my point is, they have stories to tell and things to teach us. They’ve lived through things that we ourselves can hardly imagine. Wars. Depressions. Life without computers or cellphones. They’ve lived through history. They’re amazingly strong, intelligent, and interesting human beings who have gone through real experiences.

Respect is a complicated term which can mean different things. For the purpose of this project emphasis was on the concept of unconditional respect. Respect for the elderly in this project was called “elder respect”…

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