ENDING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE WITHIN AFRICAN COMMUNITIES IN MEDWAY

This project will raise awareness of domestic violence among the African communities in Medway, work with other service providers (housing, CAB, Shelter etc.) to meet their immediate needs. and also support victims by giving them relevant information about services that will provide them with both emotional and support through the transition of leaving the abusive partner.
We aim to:
• Work in partnership with service providers in mental health and substance use services to improve their ability to support survivors of violence and abuse.
• Develop new work that recognises combinations of disadvantage that go beyond mental health and problematic substance use.
• Influence policy makers in Medway to ensure that public policy solutions around multiple disadvantages reflect the experience of women and girls who have survived violence and abuse
We will do this through
Awareness and advocacy initiatives that will include a variety of programs to improve community response. Presenting information, enlisting community and religious organizations to spread information. This initiative will encourage victims to speak out and seek help
Training for Staff and volunteers and relevant up-to-date information on domestic abuse on our website
Survivor consultation, policy briefings, consultation responses and resources on working with people experiencing mental health problems and/or problematic substance use who are affected by gender-based violence and abuse.
A bi-monthly HACO e-newsletter on violence against women and girls for practitioners working with people affected by multiple disadvantages.
Providing information about services to address physical / emotional trauma by enabling women to leave an abusive relationship if need be.
Providing crisis hotline to call in an emergency. Women who have experienced domestic violence require social support in the forms of one-on-one and group therapy.
Providing adequate service to help women plan for and cope after leaving an abusive relationship because this can be exceedingly difficult, and the multiple disadvantages make it even more difficult.
Empowering victims to protect themselves from harm by providing information that will help women find temporary or permanent shelter, workforce training, and volunteering opportunities and legal advocacy.
Effecting policy work to embed the voices and views of people affected by multiple disadvantages and gender-based violence at a local level.
Working with local mental health organisations in Medway to improve mental health responses to domestic and sexual violence.
Improving access to housing for women affected by multiple disadvantages who are experiencing housing issues.
Developing an internal policy on partner notification of HIV status for clients in abusive relationship, 30% HIV positive women being abused started at the point of disclosing their status to their partners.
What is Domestic Violence?
Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviours that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone.
Should I report Domestic Violence?
Whether you’re a victim of domestic violence or merely an observer, you should report domestic violence the moment the first punch is thrown. Call 911 immediately and tell the operator every detail you can about the abuser, the situation, and the violent acts performed, including whether or not a weapon was involved.

How to report Domestic Violence
https://www.healthyplace.com/abuse/domestic-violence/how-to-report-domestic-violence-domestic-abuse-and-hotlines

Domestic abuse: how to get help
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-abuse-how-to-get-help

For more information on this service call us on 01634 844044 0r E-mail info@healthaction.co.uk
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